Applying the Red List to Earth´s Surface

This workshop showcases a means of spatially operationalizing the IUCN Red List and demonstrates how new protected areas are being established based on Red List data.

Formed in 2000 and launched globally in 2005, the Alliance for Zero Extinction (AZE; www.zeroextinction.org) engages 75 conservation organizations working to prevent species extinctions. Specifically, the alliance is dedicated to identifying and safeguarding those sites where effectively the entire population of one or more IUCN Endangered or Critically Endangered species are restricted. Globally, there are 587 AZE sites for 920 species from groups of mammals, birds, amphibians, reptiles, conifers, and reef-building corals. The work of the alliance therefore provides a powerful tool to defend against many of the most predictable species losses.

Clearly, the first line of defense in use of this tool comprises national constituencies. To this end, a number of countries have worked over the last five years to convene national Alliances for Zero Extinction. Models for these vary, but all are united in the common goal of using IUCN Red List data to define sites where global extinctions will occur in the absence of urgent conservation action. The GEF and World Bank are developing a novel funding stream to the establishment of such national alliances.

However, many countries with large concentrations of AZE sites have not yet convened national alliances. This workshop will provide a forum of interactive, culturally-diverse, and gender-balanced working groups for participants from different countries to discuss the opportunities and challenges presented by the establishment of such alliances. Moreover, it will facilitate the emergence of interactions among participants from each working group to maintain a network of mutual support as they strive to establish new national Alliances for Zero Extinction in their own country over the coming years, and to strengthen these where they already exist.

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