Social equity

Searching for resilience in sustainable development: learning journeys in conservation

The starting point for this workshop will be an interactive audio visual presentation of the key findings of Dr John Blewitt´s and Professor Daniella Tilbury (re)search for resilience in sustainable development. They have spent a year interviewing key people in the NGO, business and private sectors about resilience and the learning journeys they, their organisations, societies or cultures have undertaken. The people interviewed included major decision makers in business, public figures, activists, community workers, conservation specialists, media professionals, educators and many more.

Benefit-sharing approaches

Benefit sharing systems should provide effective incentives for sustainable forest, genetic resources and other natural resources management and conservation activities while it builds support and legitimacy for such activities. To achieve this dual objective, benefit sharing should be more equitable than a strict focus on economic incentives allows for.

Creative participatory methodologies for protected areas management: New approaches and challenges

This Knowledge Café represents a continuation of the Knowledge Café conducted by us in 2008 at the IUCN Congress in Barcelona, and aims at promoting and advancing the discussions and experience sharing concerning new methodological and pedagogical approaches for protected areas management. Participatory methodologies for protected areas management represents one of the main challenges related to social inclusion and benefit sharing concerning biodiversity conservation strategies.

Landscape Governance Mapping: A Tool for Social Resilience

Social resilience has recently emerged as a critical component in assuring biodiversity conservation success particularly in the face of climate change. Social resilience rests on trust among stakeholders that fosters effective communication, flexibility and adaptation. One of the most critical elements of social resilience is thus understanding and promoting sound governance, the ability of institutions to assure transparent and accountable management and benefit flows. Natural resource governance systems that have authority, legitimacy, motivation and capacity to effectively manage ecosystems and the benefits they provide are critical to sustained conservation and development success. USAID and SCAPES program partners will share a landscape-scale perspective and experience with mapping and assessing governance across high-biodiversity mosaic landscapes while encouraging the adoption of more targeted metrics for tracking the effectiveness and resilience of governance.

Integrating ecosystem services into development planning - IES. Introduction to manual and training module.

Development planners are often confronted with a set of multifaceted challenges in development planning processes. Projects and policies intended to meet development goals often go forward unwittingly at the expense of nature, e.g. a national plan to expand agriculture to increase food production may increase deforestation leading to soil erosion and flooding. Frequently, the development goals are undermined as the effects of these trade-offs are felt by people who depend on nature for their livelihood and well-being.

Intensification of land use through locally controlled forest and agriculture enterprises - ways forward

Meeting future food, fuel and fibre needs for growing global population requires land use intensification. How to achieve intensification while putting the needs of the poor first, conserving biodiversity, and adapting simultaneously to climate change is a subject requiring urgent attention. This workshop will critically examine the evidence that locally controlled forestry and agriculture might offer diverse routes towards intensification that are both just and robust – in contrast with intensification that relies on large-scale monocultures of power and natural resources.

Economic Policies and Sustainability at a Time of Crisis (CEESP official session)

The Workshop will analyze the role of macroeconomic, financial and sector level policies in the transition towards sustainable development.The global economic and financial crisis underlines the need to understand how policy responses impact peoples´ livelihoods and environmental stewardship. The focus will be on 4 thematic issues:

Making benefit sharing work for forest dependent communities

Benefit sharing is an instrument for converting conservation financing into incentives for positive change at the national and subnational level. A country´s benefit sharing mechanism can determine who is involved in conservation activities. The way benefits are shared influences who bear costs, whether they are compensated, and what forms of incentives are available. While the establishment of an effective benefit sharing mechanism is achievable there are several key questions that need to be tackled beforehand, including:
• Who should benefit?

Whakatane Mechanism: a multi-stakeholder approach to solving human rights issues in protected areas? (CEESP official session)

Two Whakatane Assessments have been conducted for the first time in 2011 and 2012. They are an ambitious first step towards creating a systematic framework for assessing and contributing to the solution of human rights issues linked with protected areas. This is a concrete contribution to IUCN´s thematic areas Sharing Nature´s benefits fairly and equitably and Managing ecosystems for improved food security. Respect for human rights and community management is crucial for resilience of ecosystem and livelihoods in the face of development and climate change.

Understanding the Nagoya Protocol on Access and Benefit-sharing

Access and benefit sharing (ABS) refers to the process by which genetic resources are accessed and the benefits that result from their use are shared between those who provide the resources (providers, i.e. States, communities within those States) and those who use them (users, i.e. researchers, industries). It also relates to the traditional knowledge of indigenous and local communities (ILCs) associated with those genetic resources. ABS has the potential to enable States and their ILCs to conserve and sustainably use their biological diversity and to be rewarded for such efforts.

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