Ecosystem management

Knowledge exchange in the social cloud: New pathways for professional updating in conservation

Bring your mobile devices, smartphones, pads, laptops, cameras to engage in storytelling with a purpose: using social media to move to action in professional updating for conservation. The session will produce multimedia portable presentations, useful as training resources and as social postcards from the World Conservation Forum. We will encounter examples of excellent networked knowledge sharing, and identify key elements of quality in multimedia conservation training.

Building Resilience to climate change through Ecosystem Based Adaptation. (CEM official session)

"Healthy resilient ecosystems and communities have a greater potential to reduce vulnerability and adapt to local and global changes; they are better able to resist and recover from extreme events, including climate variability and climate change, while continuing to provide vital ecosystem services. Ecosystem based Approaches to Adaptation include a wide range of adaptation options based on integrated vulnerability assessments and sound ecosystem management.

Trends, Priorities and Actions in Ecosystem Management: Key conclusions from CEM’s Journeys

IUCN’s Commission and Programme on Ecosystem Management (CEM/EMP) have collaborated in organizing six journeys, which reflect priorities for the 2013-16 IUCN inter-sessional programme: Ecosystem Assessments, Ecosystem based Adaptation, Disaster Risk Reduction and Ecosystem Services Resilience, Drylands, and Islands. For each journey a CEM sponsored a cornerstone workshop which introduces broad concepts related to the priority.

Agriculture/Food Security and Biodiversity (CEC official event)

Recently, more than 70 global agri-food leaders in the business, policy, green, and social arenas, were consulted for a report for UNEP that exposes unforeseen areas of consensus about the challenge and possible solutions. It also exposes areas of disagreement and lays out a key set of specific "high impact" areas where smart decisions will make the most difference for sustainable and resilient food and agriculture systems.

Progress towards establishment of the IUCN Red List of Ecosystems (CEM official event)

Everyone knows that coral reefs are in danger, and that rainforests are disappearing – or do we? How much of these ecosystems are left, and what is their risk of being lost? As basic and important as these questions are to the conservation of the worlds’ biodiversity, the global community does not yet have a standard way of answering them. This also
means that we lack a reference system for promoting good ecosystem management and ensuring ecosystem health, which is increasingly seen as a critical aspect of human well being, including for disaster risk reduction, and for climate change adaptation, as highlighted by the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment. To address this major gap, in 2008, the IV World Conservation Congress approved Resolution 4.020 (Quantitative thresholds for categories and criteria of threatened ecosystems) launching a process leading to the creation of the IUCN Red List of Ecosystems. In turn, the Commission on Ecosystem Management (CEM) established the Ecosystem Red List Thematic Group to see this process through. During 2009-2011, quantitative thresholds were developed for designation of threatened ecosystems and have undergone wide testing in several countries around the world. The workshop will allow the CEM Ecosystem Red List Thematic Group to share the results to date with participants in the Forum, present a portfolio of case studies of the application of the proposed ecosystem red list categories and criteria, and seek feedback from the IUCN membership. This would be the final step in the consultation and testing process initiated in 2008. After considering all the feedback, we plan to request Council to formally adopt of the categories and criteria for the IUCN Red List of Ecosystems by early 2013.

Marine Conservation in Asia and the Pacific: Scoping Pathways for International Dialogue

Over the next decades, climate change and other factors will cause greater stress on the environment and will increase conflicts among states and groups within these states regarding access to and use of natural resources. Trade interests, control over resources and pollution are issues to be solved in dialogue to prevent conflicts, loss of biodiversity and environmental degradation. Security is closely linked to the IUCN core program area of ‘sharing nature’s benefits equitably’.

Conserving Arctic and Antarctic Marine Biodiversity

This workshop will bring together experts from IUCN, Members and stakeholders from a number of countries active in marine conservation and management in the Arctic and the Antarctic. It will explore the biodiversity and biophysical values of the Arctic and Southern Oceans and develop ways to progress MPAs and integrated, ecosystem-based management (EBM) in both. These solutions have the potential to provide groundbreaking models for other ocean areas facing the twin threats of climate change and accelerating industrial activity.

Restoring Hope: Building capacity for ecological restoration of protected areas

This workshop focuses on sharing knowledge and developing recommendations for building global capacity for ecological restoration in and around protected areas. Ecological restoration is an important management approach that offers hope that action can be taken, not only to repair ecological damage, but to renew economic opportunities, rejuvenate traditional cultural practices, and enhance ecological and social resilience to global and local changes. It is an increasingly important aspect of protected areas management.

Rethinking Protected Areas Systems: evidence-based solutions for a positive conservation future

Protected areas serve many purposes but, at their core, they must protect biodiversity. The global community has currently set aside 13% of lands and 1% of seas in protected areas and the Aichi targets commit to increasing that significantly by 2020. There is a growing literature that indicates protected areas do not always work well to conserve biodiversity.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Ecosystem management
Connection could not be established.
Array ( [0] => Array ( [0] => 28000 [SQLSTATE] => 28000 [1] => 18456 [code] => 18456 [2] => [Microsoft][SQL Server Native Client 10.0][SQL Server]Login failed for user 'drupal'. [message] => [Microsoft][SQL Server Native Client 10.0][SQL Server]Login failed for user 'drupal'. ) [1] => Array ( [0] => 42000 [SQLSTATE] => 42000 [1] => 4060 [code] => 4060 [2] => [Microsoft][SQL Server Native Client 10.0][SQL Server]Cannot open database "aspnetdb" requested by the login. The login failed. [message] => [Microsoft][SQL Server Native Client 10.0][SQL Server]Cannot open database "aspnetdb" requested by the login. The login failed. ) [2] => Array ( [0] => 28000 [SQLSTATE] => 28000 [1] => 18456 [code] => 18456 [2] => [Microsoft][SQL Server Native Client 10.0][SQL Server]Login failed for user 'drupal'. [message] => [Microsoft][SQL Server Native Client 10.0][SQL Server]Login failed for user 'drupal'. ) [3] => Array ( [0] => 42000 [SQLSTATE] => 42000 [1] => 4060 [code] => 4060 [2] => [Microsoft][SQL Server Native Client 10.0][SQL Server]Cannot open database "aspnetdb" requested by the login. The login failed. [message] => [Microsoft][SQL Server Native Client 10.0][SQL Server]Cannot open database "aspnetdb" requested by the login. The login failed. ) )