Policy

Low Carbon Green Growth Paradigm and Urban Environmental Policy (KOC official session)

Urban greenhouse gas emissions make up 43% of Korea´s total emissions, but the costs of reducing urban emissions are low, which could lead to an immediate reduction effect. Climate change responses through urban policies are extremely important
- City formation could reduce both energy use and greenhouse gas emissions by placing wind paths, water paths, forest trails, and other natural objects during urban planning stages and constructing low carbon urban infrastructures

The 2014 IUCN World Parks Congress: moving beyond targets, for protected areas that help address global challenges (WCPA official session)

The official launch event of the road to Sydney in 2014. The IUCN World Parks Congress has set the agenda for protected areas globally since the first event in 1962. At the last WPC held in Durban in 2003, the Durban Action Plan laid the foundation for the CBD’s Programme of Work on Protected Areas. For the 6th IUCN World Parks Congress, the challenge is even greater.

Progress towards establishment of the IUCN Red List of Ecosystems (CEM official event)

Everyone knows that coral reefs are in danger, and that rainforests are disappearing – or do we? How much of these ecosystems are left, and what is their risk of being lost? As basic and important as these questions are to the conservation of the worlds’ biodiversity, the global community does not yet have a standard way of answering them. This also
means that we lack a reference system for promoting good ecosystem management and ensuring ecosystem health, which is increasingly seen as a critical aspect of human well being, including for disaster risk reduction, and for climate change adaptation, as highlighted by the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment. To address this major gap, in 2008, the IV World Conservation Congress approved Resolution 4.020 (Quantitative thresholds for categories and criteria of threatened ecosystems) launching a process leading to the creation of the IUCN Red List of Ecosystems. In turn, the Commission on Ecosystem Management (CEM) established the Ecosystem Red List Thematic Group to see this process through. During 2009-2011, quantitative thresholds were developed for designation of threatened ecosystems and have undergone wide testing in several countries around the world. The workshop will allow the CEM Ecosystem Red List Thematic Group to share the results to date with participants in the Forum, present a portfolio of case studies of the application of the proposed ecosystem red list categories and criteria, and seek feedback from the IUCN membership. This would be the final step in the consultation and testing process initiated in 2008. After considering all the feedback, we plan to request Council to formally adopt of the categories and criteria for the IUCN Red List of Ecosystems by early 2013.

The Strategic Plan for Biodiversity: supporting its achievement though species conservation (SSC official session)

Species conservation is an entry point for the conservation of habitats and ecosystems as well as genetic diversity - all three components of biodiversity. The achivement of the Aichi targets would result in ´a diverse and sutainable world´.

Urban Dimensions of Nature Conservation: Roles for IUCN

Half the world´s population lives in cities; this is projected to grow to 60% by 2030 and 70% by 2050. The implications of this for nature conservation are many and complex. A few among many examples: (1) Conservation organizations depend on urban people for political and financial support, but city dwellers have less and less contact with nature; people can appreciate nature only if they know it. (2) There are often natural solutions to the challenges posed by climate change in urban areas.

Species and ecosystem conservation: streamlining planning, management, and assessment of progress

Biodiversity loss has accelerated since the CBD was adopted in 1993. Species and ecosystems are being lost at an alarming rate. Increasingly, they depend on continuing management for their survival. If we are to avoid mass extinctions, and dangerous consequences from degradation and loss of natural ecosystems, we must focus on arresting loss, and bringing about the recovery of biodiversity. Experience within the SSC has shown that, in addition to area-based approaches, planning for the conservation of individual or small groups of species is essential.

Policy tools and instruments emerging from TEEB with case studies from island ecosystems

The Economics of Ecosystems and Biodiversity (TEEB) globally raised awareness for the importance of biodiversity and ecosystem services for human well being. Following TEEB, numerous countries now engage in processes to assess ecosystem and their services at national and local level, these encompass ecological assessments and economic valuations. Yet, what policy tools and instruments are available or need to be developed to tangibly make a difference and enhance conservation throughout and beyond TEEB-like processes?

Enhancing Resilience with Nature: Translating the Science and Practice of Ecosystem Restoration into Policy

Translating the science of resilience in landscapes into practice will demand working with stakeholders in demonstration projects to undertake joint learning on how to build resilience, what the barriers are and how to best communicate concepts and ideas on resilience.

Investing in Natural Infrastructure as an Element of Green Economies

The development of Green Economies, as a pathway to sustainable development and poverty reduction, has been adopted as one of the two themes of the Rio +20 conference, which will precede and help frame discussions at the IUCN World Conservation Congress. The Green Economy approach is founded on the principle that healthy ecosystems (wetlands, forests, floodplains, estuaries, etc.), rich in natural capital, underpin sustainable economies that are resilient to external shocks. For example, a natural wetland can yield fish to ensure food security, and water to allow for irrigation.

Mainstreaming Environmental Sustainability, Disaster Risk Reduction and Climate Change

Dealing with the impacts of climate change and natural catastrophes is becoming an increasingly high priority for decision makers across the globe. The amount of global GDP exposed to harm by disasters had tripled from $525.7 billion 40 years ago to $1.58 trillion. Moreover, climate change is expected to increase the risk of disasters, and many of the predicted impacts of climate changes are identical to those being currently addressed by hazard managers, particularly in coastal areas and watercourses.

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