Indigenous peoples

Human Rights, Indigenous Peoples and a New Role for Conservation Organizations in Nature´s Governance

A key theme of the Congress is a Blueprint for Action in which participants are being asked to “put aside differences and work together to provide the means and mechanisms for good environmental governance, engaging all parts of society to share both responsibilities and the benefits of conservation.” Through this high-level dialogue, sponsored by the Conservation Initiative on Human Rights (CIHR), we will bring together Indigenous leaders, the senior leadership of international conservation organizations that are members of the CIHR, and leaders from the human rights and sustainable development fields to build a shared understanding of how human and Indigenous rights, equity and good governance underpin effective conservation, and how diverse constituencies can work together towards common goals for sharing nature’s benefits fairly and equitably.

More Effective and Equitable Nature Conservation: Lessons on Governance of Diverse Protected Areas

“Effective and equitable governance of nature’s use” is one of three pillars identified in the draft IUCN program of work for 2013-2016. This interactive workshop will focus on two main areas. First, it will provide conceptual guidance that will set the stage for how to move forward and consolidate protected area governance work within IUCN. Second, we will consolidate experience, and provide examples of governance best practice in a diversity of protected areas, including Indigenous and Community Conserved Areas (ICCAs), private protected areas, and World Heritage Sites.

Approaches to enhance social and gender equity and value indigenous knowledge through integrated ecosystem-based planning

Many studies have indicated that an ecosystem services concept is key to link the environment-development nexus and in particular that of biodiversity conservation with poverty alleviation. While remarkable research has been conducted on biodiversity protection, relevant findings and policy outcomes have not created significant impact on policy formulation and decision-making processes of development planning, mainly due to a lack of tools, models and methods for both decision-making and implementation.

Using Ecosystems and Traditional Knowledge to Help People Adapt to Climate Change: Building the Evidence Base

Adaptation to climate change comprises a wide range of potential approaches. Proponents of ´ecosystem-based approaches to adaptation´ (EbA) suggest that the maintenance or restoration of natural ecosystems are among the cheapest, most effective, and most readily implemented solutions at our disposal to lessen the impacts of climate change on people. However, there remains a lack of solid evidence to support decision-makers in terms of the contexts in which EbA may be an optimal intervention.

Rights for REDD+ or REDD+ for rights?: successful experiences and remaining challenges

One of the most controversial issues on REDD+ is the one related to the clarification of the rights over the land, trees; rights on the use, right on the carbon. The range of positions on this debate is broad and diverse making agreements difficult at local, national and international level. REDD+ is a new terminology but what is understood as REDD activities are forest practices that indigenous peoples and forest practitioners have carry out for long.

Learning from the Guardians of Sacred Natural Sites - dialogue and exchange

High level Policy makers, institutional representatives, conservation and civil society leaders will be brought together with and custodians to evaluate the options for international and national policy and practice in order to better legally recognise, safeguard and conserve Sacred Natural Sites.

Locally managed marine areas, towards a global learning network

Local and indigenous communities are intricately linked to the ocean by livelihoods, culture, and science, thus binding their governance of the marine environment with its care and conservation. As we move toward the World Summit on Sustainable Development 2012 marine target, it is timely to consider the contribution of community-based management for the protection of marine biodiversity. Though we are globally short of our marine protection targets, we have underestimated the potential of communities in governing marine managed and protected areas.

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