Energy

Solar Cooking and Its Contribution to Resilience - Environmental, Social, and Economic

More than a billion households around the world depend on wood, charcoal and other biomass for their daily cooking, leading to respiratory disease and deaths, wasting of meager household incomes spent on fuel, time lost collecting wood, in addition to land degradation, deforestation and biodiversity loss from gathering fuelwood and a significant global contribution to climate change. Solar thermal cooking offers a healthy, no-cost, pollution-free, ecosystem-friendly alternative to biomass cooking. This poster will demonstrate how substituting the sun for wood or charcoal cooking can protect forests, land and biodiversity. It will introduce the multiple resilience benefits of solar cooking – human health, economic, community, ecosystem and planetary. The poster will draw on examples of solar cooking projects around the world and their contributions, particularly recent projects in the Dominican Republic and Haiti of Solar Household Energy, The Nature Conservancy and Grupo Jaragua in which solar cooking is being introduced to reduce the harvest of wood for cooking and charcoal. In sun-rich regions, solar thermal cooking should be one of the tools available to increase the health and resilience of people, communities, ecosystems and the planet.

Understanding the biofuels policy-standards interface and its implications for biodiversity and food security

With biofuel mandates introduced by over 50 national governments around the world, there is increasing recognition that such mandates must be accompanied by biofuel policies designed to mitigate direct environmental and social impacts, as well as consider the risk of indirect impacts to food security and land use. There is also a need for biofuel policies to incentivise the development and use of the next generation of biofuels sourced from non-competing wastes and crop/forestry residues within ecological limits.

Overcoming biodiversity risks in energy development in Islands

Island nations have special energy problems which are exacerbated by the lack of land resources. Their special economic, political and environmental characteristics require an innovative approach to enable them to meet their energy requirements. Many island nations are totally dependent on imported petroleum fuels which represent a sizeable portion of their GDP.

Powering the green economy: biodiversity in energy decision making

While all energy options can have negative impacts on people and the environment, whether biofuels or wind or wave, and these impacts can be reduced or even avoided with proactive engagement in planning and siting developments. This can be as directed by governments, and also through companies employing best practice.

This poster aims to highlight the various issues and approaches identified by Members and partners, to support the transition to a green economy in their home countries.

Conservation participative de la biodiversité et développement faiblement émissif en carbone d´Ecovillages pilotes à proximité des aires protégées du Sénégal

La plupart des villages ruraux du Sénégal sont pauvres et luttent pour s´en sortir. Ils ont pour cela, besoin de solutions qui leur permettent de développer et d´investir dans de nouvelles formes durables d´accès à l´énergie et d´amélioration de leurs moyens de subsistance basés à la fois sur la recherche d´une croissance économique soutenue et d´une empreinte écologique faible.

The Wind Turbine: A Green Energy Generator or a Threat to the Ecosystem

Wind turbines are known as effective energy generating systems since they use the wind, which is renewable and freely available. Moreover, wind turbine companies claim that the system generates no pollution or waste in its operation. The American Wind Energy Association and the Midwest Renewable Energy Association assert that wind is currently the most cost-effective source of renewable energy.

Man, Development and Water: Issues and Challenges in Himalayas

Water being fulcrum of future pace of growth and development of any economy, it is expected that the proposed workshop will prove beneficial to understand the issues and challenges of water related development in context of human dimension as well know nature based solutions to climate change. In the process of development, man (human dimension) is lacking, there are policy makers and executor, but not involvement of those for whom these developmental activities have been planned.

Business and IUCN join forces: lessons learned from western gray whale conservation

The western gray whale population is listed as endangered in the Russian Federation Red Data Book and as critically endangered in the IUCN Red List. Little is known about its breeding grounds or migration routes but the main feeding grounds lie off north-eastern Sakhalin Island, in the Russian Far East.

Oil and gas decommissioning as a catalyst to enhance ecosystem function

Recently a project started that by bringing stakeholders around the North Sea together, aims to instigate a fundamental review and subsequent change of policy in determining the interaction between people, planet and prosperity in the region.

Invoking the Precautionary Principle: Shell´s approach to protecting the environment: an analysis

With a challenging but realistic ´blueprint for action´ in mind, global companies have strong environment objectives, controls and measures in place in order to make a significant contribution to ´ecosystem resilience´. Through this workshop, Shell invites feedback on its approach to protect the environment and encourages an open dialogue: are we doing enough, when and how much is enough, and how and where to improve performance?

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