Article 30 – Reservations

No reservations may be made to this Treaty.

According to Article 2 of the Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties, a reservation is a unilateral statement made by a state, when signing, ratifying, accepting, approving, or acceding to a treaty, whereby it purports to exclude or to modify the legal effect of certain provisions of the Treaty in their application to that state. Article 19 of the Vienna Convention states:

A State may, when signing, ratifying, accepting, approving, or acceding to a treaty, formulate a reservation unless:

Part R of the Basic Texts of the FAO, which governs the formulation and operation of conventions and agreements concluded under Article XIV of the FAO Constitution, like the Treaty, allows for reservations to be included in such conventions and agreements. Whether or not reservations are permitted, of course, depends on the relevant provisions of the agreement concerned. In this case, the Treaty prohibits all reservations, under Article 30.

The reason behind this strict rule is probably the desire to preserve the balance between the various obligations created by the Treaty, which could be threatened if Contracting Parties had the right to make reservations.

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